All

Watch the Black Keys Shop for Vinyl, Talk Alphabetizing Their Parents’ Collections on CBS News

View Comments
Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney of the Black Keys (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney of the Black Keys (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

By Brian Ives 

Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney of the Black Keys are vinyl enthusiasts, and they recently sat down and spoke to CBS News’s Anthony Mason about their passion for LPs.

In the video segment, you can see the duo with Mason at Grimey’s Record Store in their current home base of Nashville, digging through the racks. “I just got some Ethiopian jazz stuff,” Auerbach says, showing his vinyl picks.

The segment isn’t just about the blues-rock duo’s love for the format; it’s also about the oft-talked-about vinyl revival. In his report, Mason backs up his story with hard numbers, noting that vinyl sales have more than tripled in the last five years, with sales hitting a 22-year high (according to SoundScan) last year with 6 million albums sold.

Related: Interview: Black Keys’ Patrick Carney on Reviews, Bieber & The Power of Jell-O Meat

He also speaks to Jay Millar, the director of marketing at United Record Pressing in Nashville. Millar tells Mason that they press 30,000 to 40,000 records a day, making up 30 to 40 percent of the vinyl made in the U.S. He says that the plant works 24 hours a day, six days a week, but they plan to double their output by year’s end by adding a second building.

As for the Black Keys, they note that they pressed 100,000 copies of their latest album, Turn Blue, on vinyl —”Which is insane,” Carney notes. The album debuted at No. 1 both on the Billboard 200 and (unsurprisingly) on the vinyl chart.

Both members of the duo got into vinyl via their parents with Carney mentioning, “I actually alphabetized my parents’ record collection.”

Auerbach jokes, “I un-alphabetized my dad’s.”

But when discussing the fact that all eight of the band’s albums are available as LPs, Carney said it’s “mandatory” to have them available on vinyl, and Auerbach adding, “I don’t feel like a record’s really ‘out’ until I see it on vinyl. That’s the proof that it exists.”

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,074 other followers

Select a Live Stream

News, Sports and Talk Radio