All

Radio.com Inside Out: Avicii and Mumford & Sons’ Bluegrass Connection

View Comments
Marcus Mumford (Theo Wargo/Getty Images)and Avicii (Jacob Schulman)

Marcus Mumford (Theo Wargo/Getty Images)and Avicii (Jacob Schulman)

More Pop News
mileycyrus140bw Radio.com Inside Out: Avicii and Mumford & Sons Bluegrass ConnectionWatch Miley Cyrus’ Steamy New Video for ‘Adore You’
kanyeatamp140 Radio.com Inside Out: Avicii and Mumford & Sons Bluegrass ConnectionWatch a Video Scrapbook of Kim Kardashian and Kanye West Falling In Love
beyonce140 Radio.com Inside Out: Avicii and Mumford & Sons Bluegrass ConnectionWatch Beyonce Serenade a Terminally Ill Member of the Bey Hive with ‘Survivor’
radioCom_headlines-all-button
Radio Stations
bestof2013sofar dl 625 r2 Radio.com Inside Out: Avicii and Mumford & Sons Bluegrass ConnectionBEST OF 2013 (SO FAR)
ooocarousel 150x150 radio 100 ash Radio.com Inside Out: Avicii and Mumford & Sons Bluegrass ConnectionRADIO.COM 100
Videos
310x310-radioEssentials_profilesARTIST PROFILES YT Button[2]RADIO.COM CHANNEL

By Courtney E. Smith

Avicii’s “Wake Me Up” has got to be 2013′s most unlikely hit.

With the intention grabbing the attention of casual dance music fans and general listeners, the superstar DJ fused EDM with elements of bluegrass. Avicii’s attempt at broadening his audience paid off: “Wake Me Up” was the No. 2 most-streamed song of 2013 on Spotify, the No. 2 most-tagged song globally on Shazam this year, and has clocked 24 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 so far (peaking at No. 4).

While Avicii’s bold move left some scratching heads, it makes more sense through a wider lens of musical trends in the last couple of years. Bluegrass and banjos have become normalized within pop music through a type of act almost as surprising as a Swedish DJ/model: a British folk band.

Mumford & Sons tapped into one of the same specific sources of inspiration as Avicii: the O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack. Marcus Mumford and co. have publicly acknowledged the 2000 movie’s music, which was led by its hit single, a cover of “Man of Constant Sorrow” by the film’s fictional band the Soggy Bottom Boys. And it was lead Soggy Bottom Boy — bluegrass great Dan Tyminski — along with another unlikely collaborator (Incubus guitarist Mike Einziger) who helped Avicii find his inner twang on True, the album featuring “Wake Me Up.”

Related: Incubus’ Mike Einziger On the Making of Avicii’s Chart-Topping ‘Wake Me Up’

All this left us wondering: What does the bluegrass community make of all this, and how does it fit into the genre’s lengthy history?

With insight from bluegrass and country music legend Ricky Skaggs, we defined bluegrass and traced its roots, drawing a direct line from Irish Kaylees to the Beverly Hillbillies to The Beatles to vintage country to today’s hits. Chris Stapleton of the SteelDrivers told us how bluegrass is the new rock and roll, and Emily Robinson and Martie Maguire of the Dixie Chicks told us about being too country for country music when they wanted to incorporate bluegrass elements into their hit single “Wide Open Spaces.”

Avicii, Mike Einziger. (Jason Merritt, Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)
Avicii, Mike Einziger. (Jason Merritt, Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images)

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus