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Advertising Agency Trolls Internet with Video Featuring Kids Reciting Explicit Rap Lyrics

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(Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

(Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Unhappy with the current lyrical state of hip-hop? So is an ad agency out of Los Angeles called Amusement Park Entertainment.

The company created a very NSFW video in which several school-aged children recite some of the most explicit lyrics from rap songs that include A$AP Rocky’s “F****** Problem,” Rick Ross’ “Hold Me Back,” 2 Chainz’s “Birthday Song,” Lil Wayne’s “B*****s Love Me,” Meek Mill’s “Levels,” and, perhaps most disturbingly, Ross’ verse on Rocko’s “U.O.E.N.O.,” which includes him rapping about slipping a girl a “Molly.” The verse, which was later removed by Rocko, was criticized for glorifying rape and led Reebok to drop him as a brand spokesman.

The agency — whose website states they’ve worked with Nike, Pepsi and Gatorade — put a statement in the comments below the video to explain their intent. They insist it’s not meant to be a call for cleaner hip hop lyrics, a watering-down of the genre or a statement of condemnation. Instead, they are asking for more “balanced honest” lyrics from what they refer to as “some of my favorite rappers.”

The statement goes on to define that “balance and honesty” as:

  • Rap about the hoes, but also talk about the emotions that come with objectifying women when you may have a daughter of your own. Or better yet, a mother.
  • Rap about the money, but talk about the other side of wealth and the plethora of things it does NOT fix.
  • Rap about the violence, but don’t forget about the affect it’s had on your friends and family in prison or in caskets.

The video attempts to shine a light on the normalizing of messages of materialism, misogyny and sexuality that people of all ages are putting into their minds when they consume this kind of hip-hop. But, in choosing to use children as the subjects, the waters are muddied with the question of exposing children to adult materials.

While everyone can agree these concepts and the literal words used to express them are inappropriate for any child, not everyone would agree that they are unsuitable for adults who choose to partake.

Further, it raises the question of dictating artistry — even between creatives. The people at Amusement Park Entertainment may have tastes that veer more towards Drake – who according to Kanye West is changing the genre by limiting his use of the word b***h – but that normalization of hip-hop could arguably be seen as a homogenization of the genre.

Go here to watch the NSFW video for yourself. 

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