All

Cheap Trick Countersue Bun E. Carlos, Claim They Owe Him Nothing

View Comments
Shannon Carlin
Shannon Carlin Shannon is an associate music producer for Radio.com....
Read More
Radio.com Interviews
Mercury Nashville Kacey Musgraves
(JEAN-SEBASTIEN EVRARD/AFP/Getty Images) Gene Simmons
(Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for Barneys New York) Courtney Love
radioCom_headlines-all-button
Radio Stations
bestof2013sofar dl 625 r2 Cheap Trick Countersue Bun E. Carlos, Claim They Owe Him NothingBEST OF 2013 (SO FAR)
ooocarousel 150x150 radio 100 ash Cheap Trick Countersue Bun E. Carlos, Claim They Owe Him NothingRADIO.COM 100
Videos
310x310-radioEssentials_profilesARTIST PROFILES YT Button[2]RADIO.COM CHANNEL
(Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for John Varvatos)

(Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for John Varvatos)

Cheap Trick have filed a countersuit against their drummer Bun E. Carlos. This comes more than a month after Carlos filed a suit against the band claiming they owe him thousands of dollars.

In court papers filed on August 31 in Delaware Chancery Court, the three members of the band — Richard Nielsen, Thomas Peterson and Robin Zander — stated that after Carlos (born Brad Carlson) stopped touring with the band in 2010 he was no longer a member of the group and was “subject to removal as a corporate director without a unanimous shareholder vote,” according to Bloomberg.

“Since March 2010, Carlson has not performed with the band as a touring musician,” the group said in the suit. “The plaintiffs were (and are) free to decide that the defendant is no longer a member of the band.”

The remaining members of Cheap Trick claim in their suit that since they decided he is no longer a member of the band, they do not owe him any money.

Back in July, Carlos, along with the band’s manager, David Frey, filed a lawsuit in an Illinois court against the three other members of the band for their “outright refusals to account for, or pay, hundreds of thousands of dollars which are owed to each of the plaintiffs.”

Though Carlos stopped touring with Cheap Trick three years ago, he claims that according to an agreement all four members signed he is still considered a full-time member of Cheap Trick and is entitled to money made by the band. This includes “all remuneration that would have been paid to him had he fully performed at all of the live performances,” according to court documents.

Carlos, who formed the band back in 1973, claims the other members of the band have failed to honor the agreement, specifically citing the band’s refusal to let him partake in activities such as recording a new album and “participating in the management and operations of the Cheap Trick Companies” including the recording of the song “I Want You For Christmas” on A Very Special Christmas 25th Anniversary.

Carlos has yet to respond to his former bandmates’ recent court filings.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus