All

Radio Feedback: Randy Houser Shared His ‘First’ With Jamey Johnson

View Comments
(Taylor Hill/Getty Images)

(Taylor Hill/Getty Images)

Annie Reuter
Annie Reuter
Read More
Radio.com Interviews
Mercury Nashville Kacey Musgraves
(JEAN-SEBASTIEN EVRARD/AFP/Getty Images) Gene Simmons
(Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for Barneys New York) Courtney Love
radioCom_headlines-all-button
Radio Stations
bestof2013sofar dl 625 r2 Radio Feedback: Randy Houser Shared His First With Jamey JohnsonBEST OF 2013 (SO FAR)
ooocarousel 150x150 radio 100 ash Radio Feedback: Randy Houser Shared His First With Jamey JohnsonRADIO.COM 100
Videos
310x310-radioEssentials_profilesARTIST PROFILES YT Button[2]RADIO.COM CHANNEL

Welcome to Radio Feedback, Radio.com’s weekly feature where we ask artists to wax nostalgic on the first time they heard themselves on the radio.

Randy Houser‘s current single “Runnin’ Outta Moonlight” is climbing the charts amping up over radio airwaves, where it’s currently No. 10 on Billboard’s Country Airplay chart. Radio.com sat down with the singer to learn the story behind his first time — on the receiver, that is.

“The first time I heard my song on the radio was in the front yard of my buddy Rob Hatchett’s house,” Houser recalled. “It was me and Jamey Johnson sitting in my truck. I had just hit the Top 40 with ‘Anything Goes’ and he was probably in the 30s with ‘In Color.'”

 

Houser knew his song was about to play and went out to his car to hear it for the very first time on the radio.

“I said, ‘Jamey, let’s go out here. My song’s about to come on the countdown. It’s the first time I’ve actually heard it,'” he said.

So Houser and Johnson sat in his car listening to his debut single “Anything Goes” on the radio and a flood of memories rushed passed him.

“[I was] remembering learning to play the guitar as a small child. My daddy teaching me chords and all the nights I spent in my bedroom playing that guitar and singing and learning how to play and sing. Then learning how to write songs,” he said. “All those clubs that I played for so many years. Learning how to work a crowd and learning how to play with a band and all of those things that I did all through my teenage years. Just years and years of experiences really flooded my mind. Things that I had forgotten about really came to the surface. It was just a really amazing experience.”

Houser said the memories come back every time he hears a new song of his on the radio.

“I’ll have a different memory come to mind [each time]. It’s exciting every time you hear your song on the radio. It should be. I think if it gets to the point where that’s not cool, then that’s not cool,” he said.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,984 other followers

Select a Live Stream

News, Sports and Talk Radio